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Courser Farm Sugar Shack, Warner, NH

An authentic sugar shack on the Courser Farm in Warner offers visitors an up-close view of the boiling down of sap as it has been done by one family for generations. Freshly made syrup is all that is sold from this wooden sap house built in 1957 to replace a lean-to constructed to provide syrup as a replacement for sugar during World War II rationing. Jerry Courser boils the sap that his brother Tim collects. "I began making syrup as a child in the family driveway because it was the only time I was allowed to play with fire," he says. The Courser brothers tap family trees on their own land and, in the New England tradition, barter sap from neighbors in return for syrup. Today there are 1,000 taps providing about 200 gallons of syrup each year. Jerry points the visitor to the top of the hill behind the shack to ...

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Great Brook Farm, Walpole, NH

It was the year 1761, a mere nine years after  Walpole was chartered, that John Graves bought two large lots and moved from Saybrook, Connecticut to New Hampshire. The history of two of the tracts is lost. The third piece, today called Great Brook Farm named after the brook nearby, continues the Graves dairy farming tradition that John began almost 250 years ago. Peter Graves, who represents the ninth generation of the farm being handed down from father to son, lives with his wife, Brenda, and their family in the original farm house. Peter runs the dairy and manages the cattle and land. In addition to the 150 acres that he owns, he leases 300 acres to grow hay and corn and for grazing. Andy Westover, the tenth generation, works the farm with Peter. To quote, Peter's sister Cindy Graves Westover "Preserving a dairy farm these days is not easy; there are so many ...

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Barrett Hill Farm, Mason, NH

Located high on a hill in Mason, New Hampshire Barrett Hill Farm has seen its share of lightning. In fact, it was lightning that destroyed the original farmhouse and barns, forcing the farm to be moved to Ashburnham, Massachusetts. Ralph Barrett fully rebuilt the farm in the 1960’s on a beautiful spot from which you can see Boston. Lightning rods now, of course, crown the farmhouse and each of the barns. No sense tempting fate. Today, although Ralph and wife Sandy are still a big part of the farm life and continue to live on the land, their son, Matt LeClair and his wife Beth have farmed Barrett Hill since Matt’s graduation from the University of New Hampshire in 1990. Named a “New Hampshire Farm of Distinction” in 2010, it’s clear that the New Hampshire Department of Agriculture Markets and Food agrees that the LeClairs are fine stewards of this 1792 ...

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Spring Ledge Farm, New London, NH

 Most of New Hampshire’s farms are located amongst hills and woodlands. Not so Spring Ledge Farm in New London, NH. This beautifully laid out farm is one of a very few in the state situated on conservation land in the middle of a bustling town. The pride of the town’s Main Street, the farm is situated between two sections of a commercial zone. John and Sue Clough opened the farmstand in 1976 on land John’s family had owned since before the Civil War. Fortunately, as the years passed and their farm gained in importance to them and the town, land conservation became a priority. “Ultimately,” according to Merrimack County’s Conservation News, “the Cloughs reached a decision to dedicate the bulk of the farm to a perpetual easement, thus preserving this unique in-town farm.” In the late 1980s, one of the Cloughs helpers was a 15 year old named Greg Berger, a resident of ...

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Beans & Greens Farm, Gilford, NH

One look at www.beansandgreensfarm.com will tell you that Beans & Greens farm owners Andy and Martina Howe know how to move a farm from the past into the present and on into the future. As for the past, it was 1986 when they discovered that selling milk and hay as a dairy farm was a good life, but found it difficult to raise a growing family on what they were making  just wasn’t going to cut it so, they sold their herd with the idea of going into the business of selling replacement heifers. By then Martina, very pregnant, found the vigors of the farm limited her contributions to sitting by the roadside selling sweet corn while Andy chopped field corn. And then, more reality struck; Andy was kept busier picking sweet corn to restock Martina’s supply, and says Martina, “Our minds immediately began churning with plans for a vegetable farm stand operation.”  ...

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Yankee Farmer's Market, Warner, NH

To help pay for college, Brian Farmer made extra money flipping buffalo burgers for his cousin at fair concession stands. Needing extra help, hehired a very attractive college pal who happened to be a co-ed name Keira and a year later they were married.  After graduating from college they followed their respective career paths, Brian in engineering and Keira, marketing. Forever etched in their taste buds, however, was the flavor of those buffalo burgers. In 1997, Brian’s cousin offered to sell the couple five buffalo and, unable to resist the temptation, they began raising these gargantuan beasts on family property in Hillsboro. While Brian continued to work full-time, Keira reduced her hours of work to care for the animals – meaning that she essentially gave them food and water. Buffalo are pretty much free maintenance, no housing required and they eat field grass and hay. By 2002, the couple was able to ...

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Tuckaway Farm, Lee, NH
January 15, 2015

Tuckaway Farm, Lee, NH

“When it comes to agriculture in NH, we are like an underdeveloped country.” So says Dorn Cox who is currently making a concerted effort to push farming squarely into the 21st century by building what he refers to as a “biological system” for his farm; it is a most singular system and very much a family enterprise. By successfully integrating the disciplines of plant biology and environmental engineering, Dorn is working to tighten the carbon cycle while also reducing production costs, and limiting off farm purchases which will make the farm more self sufficient.

Kearsage Gore Farm, Warner, NH
December 19, 2014
Kearsage Gore Farm, Warner, NH

Bob Bower and Jennifer Ohler own and maintain Kearsarge Gore Farm in Warner, New Hampshire with the help of their children, Sam, and Abby. The farm’s name originates from its location in a gore – a thin triangular piece of land – between two towns. The family bought the farm in 1981.

The farm occupies 477 acres of land on one side of Kearsarge Mountain. Seven acres are used to grow certified organic produce, 20 acres are in pasture, and 450 acres are woodland. Kearsarge Gore earned organic certification in 1988 and was one of the first certified organic farms in the area

Muster Field Farm, North Sutton, NH
December 13, 2014
Muster Field Farm, North Sutton, NH

The wonderful Muster Field Farm is a farm that has a lot of historical value in the tiny town of Sutton, New Hampshire. The farm was founded as the Harvey Homestead in 1772 by Matthew Harvey. The original house that was built had burnt down in 1787. The current house that is on the property was built shortly after, but has expanded since it was built. The new house was used as a tavern for the locals to drink at, the first post office and first library in Sutton, and a home for the descendants of the Harveys. In total, eight generations of Harvey descendants lived on the farm and added to it.

Greenhill Collective Farm, Sutton, NH
December 10, 2014
Greenhill Collective Farm, Sutton, NH

Greenhill Collective, located in Sutton, New Hampshire, is a small, off the grid, certified organic farm owned and operated by Ben Dubrowski and his family. The “Collective” part of the farm name is related to the vision of eventually renting out small portions of the farm to people that want to farm but don’t have the land to. They specialize in the

Canterbury Aleworks, Canterbury, NH
December 8, 2014
Canterbury Aleworks, Canterbury, NH

Canterbury Aleworks is a small brewery established in 2012. Located in Canterbury, New Hampshire, the brewery is run by Steve Allman, with help from his family.

In 1985 Steve Allman bought 72 acres of land and in 1987 built a small cabin that he would call home. He named his farm “Hidden Wonders” because of its hidden location and reputation as “the seven wonders of Canterbury” and began producing vegetables and meat for his family in 1996

Glove Hollow Christmas Tree Farm, Plymouth, NH
December 5, 2014
Glove Hollow Christmas Tree Farm, Plymouth, NH

Over 400 acres of land has been family owned and operated by the Aherns since 1897, and is now home to Glove Hollow Christmas Tree Farm on Route 3 in Plymouth, New Hampshire. The name “Glove Hollow” comes from the name of a brook where in the 1900s a fine leather glove making facility was located. The foundation of the Draper Maynard manufacturing facility can still be seen on the farm.
With 80,000 Christmas trees aligned in rows, it is hard to imagine that the land was originally home to a dairy farm until Omer Ahern planted his first Balsams in 1957. The land located by the Pemigewasset River provides a fertile plot for tree farming. Today, Omer’s son Mike a fourth generation owner, with his shearing crew of eight tend

Country Critters Farm, Winchester, NH
November 28, 2014
Country Critters Farm, Winchester, NH

“It’s all about the animals.” That’s what Julie Thiboreau will tell you if you pay her a visit at Country Critters Farm in Winchester. The 53 acre farmstead purchased and restored by Julie and her husband, Mike, in 2001, is home to three cows (TC, Princess and Weird), 2 calves (Jasmine and Liberty), a Shetland ram (Owassos ) and two ewes (Lillith and Franchesca), a few rabbits, a Great Pyrenees dog (Rose) and two barn cats. Julie loves the animals;